National Conference ­ ISAA

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National Conference


ISAA National Conference 2016

ISAA National Conference

13-14 October 2016

National Library of Australia

 

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly; Shaping Public Policy in Australia: Past, Present, Future.

 In its broadest sense the term public policy refers to the range of means by which government and public agencies determine or influence how society functions. In shaping and making of any public policy, numerous individuals and groups may interact with government in competitive and collaborative ways to identify problems and influence policymakers to act in a particular way. The shaping of any public policy is rarely uncontested, and is commonly the outcome of the interaction of institutional structures, individuals and groups with differing values and power, economic and social forces, and unfolding events.

 Thus the making of public policy is a complex process. The policy on any subject is likely to have been determined by technical questions, empirical evidence, politics, ideology, and a host of other drivers.  Bismarck is reputed to have once said ‘Laws are like sausages. It is better not to see them being made.’ A more positive perspective is that ‘good policy makes good politics’, although more than one book has been written describing cases where ‘good politics made for bad policy’.

 • The theme of the ISAA conference in 2016 is focused on the processes that shape public policy. It is designed to be inclusive of the great diversity of expertise and interests of our members. Papers may focus on the very big picture - such as the development of policy on immigration from the 19th century or the changing nature of policy in response to climate change - down to more local and limited topics such as urban development in Melbourne in the 1850s in response to the gold rush, or the current lock-out laws in Kings Cross.

• The theme also gives scope to those whose speciality lies mainly outside government and policy. For example, for members with literary and artistic interests, papers on the conference theme could encompass policy affecting these fields, or how particular works reflected and revealed public policy at the time, or how works may have influenced public opinion and ultimately policy.

• The theme is focused primarily on the factors that shape policy rather than on the content or effects of policy. In this way, the theme will enable a very wide range of subject matter, but have a common core. By providing for a wide canvas that can cover diverse subject areas, time frames, and policies, the papers taken together should reveal some common features of how policy is shaped while also pointing up features that are distinctive to each time, place, and activity.

 Deadline for abstracts is 17 June 2016

Please send to: cjennett@ozemail.com.au

 

NEWS FROM THE CONFERENCE

 

The Independent Scholars Association of Australia Inc recently held its 2015 annual conference: Celebrating Independent Thought: ISAA Twenty Years On.

The second panel session, ‘Scholarship of the Future’, was led by Emeritus Fellow Colin Steele (ANU) who spoke on ‘Academic publishing futures’. The other speakers were Roxanne Missingham, University Librarian, ANU and Dr Katherine Bode, Senior Lecturer, Centre for Digital Humanities Research, ANU, on the future of libraries and scholarship in the digital age.

Colin Steele was University Librarian at ANU from 1980 to 2002, and then Director of Scholarly Information Strategies. He is the author/editor of seven books and over three hundred articles/reviews. Colin has been Chair of the Council of Humanities and Social Sciences Academic Book Prize from 2014 and is currently Chair of the National Scholarly Communications Forum. He is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, the Australian Library and Information Association and the UK Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

Publishing is facing significant challenges in the Internet era. Academic publishing is not exempt from the global turmoil. Library book purchasing, particularly in the context of the declining Australian dollar, have recently been reduced in several university libraries, and e-books are not the complete answer. Are the new models for open access book publishing the answer? The pros and cons of current open access academic book publishing were examined. The following is a summary of Colin Steele’s powerpoint presentation. A full version of his talk will be published in the Proceedings of the conference.

•  Context of Presentation:

  • Academic book publishing focus rather than general trade or serial publishing
  • Although similarities in mergers and power consolidation – from Elsevier in academic publishing to Penguin/Random House in general trade publishing

•  Publish or Perish Continues

  • Major problem for young academics who have to play by the publishing rules for appointments, promotion and tenure
  • Current conservative ‘print’ models of research evaluation and university league tables
  • Publish with whom? For whom? At what cost?

•  HASS Monographs – Big Business for Some

  • The monograph still gold Research Evaluation standard
  • The ‘new’ Australian university presses publish far more academic works than the traditional four cited by Louise Adler in 2013 - MUP, UNSW, UWA and QUP
  • Informa (Taylor and Francis/Routledge) paid £45 million for Maney/Ashgate July 2015 -operating profit 6 months to June 30 2015 = £190.4million
  • Sell 2-300 high price copies to US/UK libraries

•  Audience for Academic Books?

  • NEH public scholar program- Humanities scholarship beyond academic departments and university campuses -US$1.7 million Sept 2015
  • PM Prize 2010-13 and CHASS prize 2014-15

•  University Press Figures 2015

  • CUP - Sales to April 2015 £269 million-operating profit £6.7 million
  • OUP turnover £767 million -pre-tax profits £104 million
  • Digital products more than half of the OUP academic turnover
  • Of the 105 members of the American Association of University Presses - only 9 have annual sales of more than $6 million -most have revenues of under $1.5 million
  • Reinventing University Publishing CAUL Seminar March 2015
  • Is open access the answer but which model?

•  Publisher OA Book Fees – OAPEN

  • Cambridge £6,500 for up to 120,000 words
  • Manchester University Press £5,900 for titles up to 80,000 words /Palgrave Open £7,500 - £11,000
  • Springer Open Depends on size of work – €15,000
  • Deakin Lecturer politics book
  • What constitutes vanity publishing?
  • Compare ANU Press lower distributed costs model

•  Open Access Monographs

  • Australia a world leader in this area - a fact often overlooked by northern hemisphere commentators
  • ANU Press 2003 preceded Knowledge Unlatched, Open Library of the Humanities and US OA publishing initiatives
  • Relevant presses Monash, Sydney, University of Technology and Adelaide university presses
  • Adelaide averages 10,000 downloads from each of its 47 titles
  • Operate through their university libraries in Australia - part of scholarly communication infrastructures

•  ANU Press OA Statistics

  • 500th Open Access title January 2014
  • Digital now the norm but POD copies available at cost
  • ANU Press had 608,722 complete or partial downloads of Press books Jan – Aug 2015
  • Press downloads increasingly useful metric
  • ANU Model followed by UCL Press – “A 21st approach to the dissemination of knowledge” Michael Arthur. Provost

•  University Libraries and Print Books

  • ‘Academic libraries in the early 21st century metamorphosis or dissolution?’  David McKitterick
  • Impact of declining Australian dollar on library budgets already “straightjacketed” by STM ‘Big Deals’
  • Decline in print monograph purchasing
  • E-books not the simple answer
  • Issues in e-book ownership/licensing/content provision/ academic acceptance etc

•  Print Book Revival?

  • UK Nielsen Bookscan for first 36 weeks of 2015, shows print book sales up 4.6% – the first rise since 2007
  • US E-book sales fell 10% up to May 2015 (AAP figures from 12,000 publishers) – E-books 20% of US market
  • Also 2015 rise in US independent bookstores

 •  Digital Dark Ages?

  • Vincent Cerf, “Father of the Internet argues we need “digital vellum” book repositories
  • University libraries weeding or rejecting collections
  • Fate of retired academics libraries – Waterford
  • James Joyce – Amazon ignorance
  • Page and screen reading – attention and comprehension issues

•  UK Academic Book of the Future November

  • New Australian Book Council ignores academic books?
  • Powerful incentives to publish scholarly books but print sales and readership declining
  • While books remain a critical part of the scholarly infrastructure in analogue form
  • How do we integrate books into the wider digital environment – both public and scholarly

ISAA NATIONAL CONFERENCE 1 & 2 October 2015


Download Attached Files

Download: Latest Conference Program.pdf
File size: 263.01KB

Celebrating Independent Thought

ISAA Twenty Years On

 

Thursday 1 & Friday 2 October 2015

 

Fourth Floor Conference Room

 

National Library of Australia, Canberra ACT

Download Latest Conference Program for details of all sessions

 

 In addition to seven sessions of papers on various aspects of independent scholarship – in journalism, language, art, pioneer science, and socio-culture issues – there will be two panel sessions. The first of these will be Reflecting on twenty years of ISAA, led by founding member David Headon and including five senior ISAA members – Ann Moyal, Auriol Weigold, Gretchen Poiner, Mike Austin, Doug Cocks – who have made significant contributions to ISAA since its founding in 1995.

The second panel session, with the theme of Scholarship of the Future, will be chaired by Emeritus Fellow Colin Steele (ANU) who will speak on ‘Academic publishing futures’, with participation from Roxanne Missingham and Dr Katherine Bode who will discuss the future of libraries and scholarship in the digital age.

Publishing is facing significant challenges in the Internet era. Academic publishing is not exempt from the global turmoil. Library book purchasing, particularly in the context of the declining Australian dollar, have recently been reduced in several university libraries, and e-books are not the complete answer. Are the new models for open access book publishing the answer? The pros and cons of current open access academic book publishing will be examined.

Colin Steele was University Librarian at ANU from 1980 to 2002, and then Director of Scholarly Information Strategies. He is the author/editor of seven books and over three hundred articles/reviews. Colin has been Chair of the Council of Humanities and Social Sciences Academic Book Prize from 2014. Colin is a Fellow of the Australian Academy of the Humanities, the Australian Library and Information Association and the UK Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals.

 

ISAA ANNUAL LECTURE

Professor Julian Disney AO 

 

6.00 pm, Thursday 1 October 2015

 

Fourth Floor Conference Room

 

 National Library of Australia, Canberra ACT

 

Julian Disney's lecture ‘Independence and integrity in the public domain’ will focus on the importance of constructive independence and integrity in the public domain. This applies to presenting facts, expressing opinions, casting votes and many other actions that may affect public discussion and outcomes in the community. It embraces conduct of parliamentarians and public servants, journalists and commentators, businesses and unions, academics and community leaders.

The lecture will also emphasise the need for due respect for the views and actions of others, including public figures, rather than persistent misrepresentation, abuse or suppression. It will also emphasise that governments, the mass media and other powerful forces in society should enhance access to information, diversity of opinion and freedom of speech for the general community, rather than principally for themselves.

Julian Disney is Professor of Law and Social Justice, and Director of the Social Justice Project, at the University of NSW. He is the founder and National Chair of Anti-Poverty Week and on the Board of Governors of the Committee for the Economic Development of Australia. Prof Disney has been Chair of the Australian Press Council, the Australian Council on Social Service, the National Affordable Housing Summit, the International Council on Social Welfare and a numerous organisations and government-appointed inquiries at state, national or international level. He has been the principal author or editor of books and articles relating to aspects of, governance, the media and national development as well as of the legal profession, taxation, housing and social welfare.

Prof Disney is a former South Australian Rhodes Scholar, Law Reform Commissioner and Director of the ANU Centre for International and Public Law. In 1995 he was awarded an AO for services to the development of economic and social welfare policy, and to the law.

 

2015 ISAA ANNUAL CONFERENCE


Download Attached Files

Download: Latest Conference Program.pdf
File size: 263.01KB

 

2015 ISAA Annual Conference

 1 & 2 October 2015

The 2015 Annual Conference is a particularly important event as, in 2015, ISAA is celebrating its 20th birthday.

Theme:

Celebrating Independent Thought: 

ISAA TWENTY YEARS ON

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CALL FOR PAPERS

 

It is now 20 years since ISAA held its first conference at the National Library of Australia. ISAA’s founders aimed ‘To raise the profile of independent scholars in Australia and to increase awareness of their diversity and expertise; to facilitate the wide contribution of independent scholars to the public sphere; and to provide community and contact for scholars, who, for the most part, conduct their work in circumstances of some isolation’. Later they added ‘to give a voice to dissent’ (Moyal 2014). It is time to Review ISAA’s performance over the past two decades and look to future decades of this important organisation. How well has ISAA fulfilled its goals? Are they still appropriate ones twenty years on? What is the role of independent scholarship in the contemporary world?

 

 ISAA members wishing to present a paper at the 2015 Annual Conference should submit the title and a short abstract (100 words) by Friday 19 June 2015, preferably as an email attachment (Word or rtf) to cjennett@ozemail.com.au. Papers should be related to the conference theme of independent thought and scholarship. Each speaker will have 20 minutes with an additional 10 minutes for questions. The conference is an opportunity for ISAA members to attract interest in their work and expose it to the encouraging scrutiny of their peers and the public. Members should note, however, the general rule (to which exceptions are sometimes made) that they cannot present a paper two years in a row. New members are particularly encouraged to submit an abstract. Some non-members will also be invited to make presentations.

 

 Details of the conference program will be advised after the abstracts have been received and considered.

 

 The ISAA Annual Lecture held in conjunction with the Annual Conference will be presented at 6pm on Thursday 1 October 2015. Speaker to be advised.

 

 The ISAA Annual General Meeting will take place at 2.30pm on Friday 2 October 2015 after the last session of the conference

 

 Contact for conference: Christine Jennett  cjennett@ozemail.com.au; mobile 0419498461

 

 

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2014  ISAA Annual Conference

THE LUCKY COUNTRY: 50 YEARS ON

Donald Horne’s The Lucky Country was first published 50 years ago. Horne wrote that Australia was a lucky country run mainly by second-rate people who shared its luck.

Was this observation correct at the time he wrote the book? Is it applicable now, in 2014?

See ISAA National Newsletter, December 2015

for Conference Report.

Conference Proceedings will be available in 2015